The Girl From Venice

The Girl From Venice

eBook - 2016
Average Rating:
18
10
Rate this:
'Martin Cruz Smith makes tension rise through the page like a shark's fin' Independent From the internationally bestselling author of Gorky Park comes a suspenseful World War II story set against the beauty, mystery and danger of occupied Venice.Venice, 1945. The war may be waning, but the city known as La Serenissima is still occupied and the people of Italy fear the power of the Third Reich. One night, under a canopy of stars, a fisherman named Cenzo finds a young woman's body floating in the lagoon and soon discovers that she is still alive and in trouble. Born to a wealthy Jewish family, Giulia is on the run from the Wehrmacht SS. Cenzo chooses to protect Giulia - an act of kindness that leads them into the world of Partisans, Mussolini's broken promises, and, everywhere, the enigmatic maze of the Venice Lagoon...
Publisher: 2016. ,
ISBN: 9781849838177
Branch Call Number: REM
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Additional Contributors: OverDrive

Related Resources


Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Quotes

Add a Quote

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

***Likely a few Typos***
Fishermen were nocturnal creatures who slept by day and fished by night. They stayed out on the lagoon for days at a time and when they came ashore they smelled so much of fish that cats followed them through the streets.
===
A woman on a boat was bad luck, and he supposed a dead girl was even worse.
===
“We give people here too much credit. Fishing in a lagoon is like fishing in a barrel.” … “Yes, but you have to know where the barrels are.”
===
“Do you know why Italians fish o their hands and knees? Because it’s the normal position for an Italian. Isn’t that the way you fish?” Cenzo shrugged. “It depends on the fish. Some you catch with a hook, some with a net, and some you have to get down and tickle under the chin.”

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

… compared to a gunboat, the Fatima is, well, not much faster than a cork.
===
“Thin ice my friend, very thin ice. Remember, even a worm has teeth.”
===
Even in mourning, everything about her was heaving and buxom, with a healthy olive complexion and long, black stockings that begged to be unrolled. It was customary in the village for an unmarried man to marry the widow of his brother, in this case Hugo, a deed that seemed overdue. Celestina certainly seemed willing, and yet, Cenzo was numb to her attraction.
===
“She’s too young to be alone. If it comes to that, Innocenzo, you’re too young to be without a woman.”
===
“You’re impossible. Name one flaw in Celestina.” “I can’t. She could make a sausage stand up and whistle.”
===
She was from Venice and he was from Pellestrina, which was like saying they were not only from opposite sides of the lagoon but from different worlds. When she spoke she had an elegantly lazy Venetian accent. When he spoke, consonants disappeared.

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

“Did I tell you about Byron?” “You told me. Was he a good fisherman?” “I don’t know.” “So we’re even.”
===
He thought fish were mysterious, more a race than a species, and an invitation to another world. If she didn’t see it that way, it was her loss.
===
His younger brother Hugo never learned how to swim. Some fishermen were like that, as if knowing how to swim invited the necessity.
===
“My father said you never know who your friends are until you need them.”
===
What claim did a husband have compared to the passion of a lover?
===
He walked around her. She had cropped her hair into a shaggy nightmare. “You wouldn’t fool a blind man.”

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

“Teach me how to fish.” “Are you willing to get wet and stink like a fish?” “Better than being a prisoner. But I need a rod and reel.” “Do you? I suppose if you’re a rich man and have all day to catch a fish, that’s one way to go about it. But if you’re a professional fisherman and have to catch a thousand, you use a net. You don’t chase the fish with a hook and sinker, you welcome him to your net.”
===
“Things you should know: A clean boat never makes money. A red moon makes the blood boil. Never fish the same ground two days in a row. At the market, cover your old fish with your fresh. A real fisherman doesn’t need boots. Fish jump to breathe. The caption of a fishing boat sleeps at the stern, the crew at the bow. Fishermen know how to wash dishes with sand. The best soup is at the bottom of the pot. When you’re rowing, watch out for mines. Good luck will kiss you in bad weather.”
===
“What about women in boats?” “Definitely bad luck. Unless they’re naked. That’s good luck.”

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

“Since when do you sail with girls?” “One girl,” Cenzo said. “When it comes to bad luck, one girl will do as well as a dozen….”
===
… he did not believe In this war and his sole intent was to outlive it.
===
“ ’Such hath it been—shall be—beneath the sun/ The many still must labor for the one!’ Byron.”
===
“Octopus is an interesting character. He winks at you and disappears. Squid is a torpedo. Flatfish are clowns with two eyes on one side because God has a sense of humor. And a cuttlefish is not so much a fish as an inverted mollusk that swims backwards.”

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

Cenzo said, “Do you hear that, Nido? A girl is willing to go where grown men are afraid to tread. How does that make you feel?” “That my skin comes first …”
===
For his brother, everything was geometry. One angle determined another angle, which determined a third angle, and so on.
===
Í once boxed in Burma. I had a friend there who was a veterinarian and he had a friend, a woman, who got a pet python when it was just a baby. S’true. A beautiful snake with amber eyes. As it grew, it would coil up in her lap when she was reading and coil next to her in bed when she was asleep. One night, the veterinarian got a phone call from the woman. She was nervous because, instead of coiling, the python was stretched out next to her in bed. Completely stretched. From head to tail. The veterinarian told her to get out of bed and out of the house. He said, “It’s measuring you.” “What are you trying to tell me?” “Be careful who you embrace.”

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

“I’m learning to fish,” Giulia said. “From my friend Cenzo? I could sell tickets to that.”
===
“Us. We are the crabs, climbing over each other and shedding our own shells, Fascists one moment, Reds the next.”
===
“A wise man,” he liked to say, “keeps his ignorance to himself.”
===
The German army had two hundred thousand veteran troops in Italy. Mussolini had fifty thousand hard-core Fascists. Together they controlled Milan, Turin, Genoa and Verona and Salo, the new capital of the German Republic. The war was lost, but it wasn’t over.
Maria Paz was In her late thirties, an athletic woman with bangles on her wrist and a hint of carnal knowledge to her smile. Cenzo could picture her at the head of a conga line.
===
…and the shirts bore his monogram GGV for Giorgio “Giovanni” Vianello. The middle name was always given by the church and the name for boys in Pellestrina was always Giovanni.

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

"What if Salo is bombed?” “It won’t be. At least it hasn’t been.” “Why not? Mussolini is here.” “It would be a waste of ammunition. Ask yourself: which is more important, Mussolini or a locomotive.”
===
“Did you know that the violin was invited in Salo? Remarkable place.”
===
“Brother Cenzo, what is it like under the stars on the Venice lagoons? What’s the biggest fish you ever saw?” “An anchovy. Before it split into ten thousand fish.”
===
It wasn’t clear whether he was in over his head or “just smart enough to fool the fish,” as his father used to say.
===
“How did she escape?” “She swam across the lagoon.” “Nobody swims across the lagoon.” “Byron did.” Dante’s stare gave way to a smile and he closed his notebook. “So they say.” “That’s impossible,” the Spaniard said. “Not only impossible, but in iambic tetrameter,” Dante said. “ ‘She walks in beauty, like the night/ Of cloudless climes and starry skies … ‘ Perhaps it should have been ‘She swims in beauty …’ ”

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

“You know, a month from now, you and I might be strolling in a liberated Venice. It will be like the day after Carnival when all the masks come off and it will become evident who are the heroes, who are the traitors, and who are the innocent victims. I think there will be many surprises, some quite said.”
===
Vera slapped her cards down on the table. “I hate bridge.” “Of course you do,” said Giorgio. “Bridge takes sobriety, like chess.”
===
He wasn’t sure how he felt about Maria Paz. At the start he felt there was too little explained about her and then too much, like a box that might or might not contain high explosives. Nothing in between.
===
There were seven tunnels along the Garda Road, each wide enough to accommodate a tank; and where the tunnels opened up, they invited spectacular plunges down to the water. The road was a perfect escape route from Salo to Switzerland. Also a perfect trap.
===
“So now you're showing initiative?” said Giorgio. “Too little, too late, as usual.”

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

“Cole Porter said it best. ‘You’re the top, you’re Mussolini. You’re the top, “you‘re a dry martini.’”
===
An honest man is always called a cynic. You think that the liberation will be like the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace? It won’t be. It will be murderers and grave robbers, a parade of the lowest forms of humanity. You deal with them or end up with your pants down.
===
A German name was not unusual: ten percent of the Argentine population was German and ten percent was Italian. They accounted for Argentina’s sympathies during the war.
===
“Where do you fit in?” Cenzo asked. “Oh, I’m just a middleman. I merely address the need.” “That’s very Swiss of you.”
===
As I was saying, everybody compromises. At times like these, there is nothing ignoble about survival.

View All Quotes

Comment

Add a Comment

s
SandraLH
Jun 25, 2017

Was waiting for the paperback book to become available at the library and noticed the DVD on the shelf. Enjoyable, creative fantasy!

7
7626dee
Jun 07, 2017

Not his usual style but interesting as a study of Italy/Venice in WWII. His passive hero's are somewhat difficult to take and this passive resistance is what got Italy in so much trouble in WWII.

b
brangwinn
Apr 23, 2017

I read this book because I was intrigued by the cover, but was less than enthralled by the story. I’ve not read any other books by Martin Cruz Smith so I have nothing else to which to compare it. I need more depth to a story.

u
USAF1969
Feb 25, 2017

Been hooked on Smith since GORKY PARK. This story is not his usual criminal/thriller and Renko. But I really liked it. The story was different from his usual, but engaging and kept moving along. I am a WW II history buff anyway, so I liked the story line on that count as well. As always, LARGE PRINT is worth the wait.

n
njon38
Feb 16, 2017

Set in the waning days of WWII in the chaos of Venice at war’s end where factions of Nazis, Fascists and various partisan groups are fighting for control of post war Italy. Smith blend all of this with a charming love story between a simple fisherman and a woman from a wealthy Jewish family. It lack the tension of his russian novels which makes it a wonderful read.

a
AlmadenAFS
Jan 14, 2017

Another good read from Smith. I've never been disappointed with his books.

l
Laineylovestoread
Dec 18, 2016

I enjoyed the books beginning but quickly changed to a different story completely, making it unbelievable.

s
singasong70
Nov 11, 2016

Didn't like it as much as previous works: time shifting - disorienting not to mention dialouge of girl didn't ring true for me either- she sounded more like a 25 year old than a 18 year old. Happy ending unrealistic I thought plus what birth control method was this girl using? I'm surprised she didn't get pregnant considering all the love making going on.

l
looper46
Nov 11, 2016

Almost a travelogue, does paint a lovely picture of Venice and the surrounding area...But, also a scary story of WWII Italy, the Fascist and the Gestapo.

Reminded me abit of Alan Furst's writings, a thriller. a good read, haven't read much of Smith's writings since his series of Renko novels.

Entertaining, but not sure long it will be on best seller list...

j
jimg2000
Nov 10, 2016

Not a detective Renko mystery but a multifaceted story about being Venetians during the German Occupation towards the end of WWII as partisans, fascists, pacifists, spies, smugglers ... and a lonesome fisherman. No less than Donna Leon's Commissario Brunetti novels and films, Smith painted the landscape and people around the Venice Lagoons in vivid colors while telling a romantic wartime story about a fisherman and a young Jewish girl on a treacherous journey to escape from a Nazi villain.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Explore Further

Related Authors

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at LCCL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top